You can get your Dream Bike Today

Through the clever use of financing! Unlike using your Visa or line of credit, we offer Zero percent financing! Yes you read that right ZERO Percent!
Russell explains Zero
For years we here at Via Ciclante having been helping out cyclists with financing of 12 months 0% financing, with just a $40 administration fee and the sales tax up front. However until June 21st we are opening up our financing plan for longer terms for higher end bicycles. We will offer 18 months of 0% financing on bikes over $2000, and 24 months of 0% financing on bikes over $5000! We have partnered with Desjardins Accord D to offer this great program, which we administer in store.
So if you have been lusting after that Cervelo R5, Yeti SB5, Trek Project one, Giant Reign, or Moots Vamoots drop us an email at sales@viaciclante.com. Or if you find yourself round Mississauga swing by the bike shop and we can fill you in on the details to get you riding the bike you have been dreaming about.

Tune up Guide

 

As spring has sprung and we are thinking about getting our bikes back outside, perhaps a little maintenance would be in order to have your trusty steed working to it’s full potential. Our head mechanic Roy has outlined the steps in our variety of services of maintenance packages and labour pricing for your perusal and consideration

$150 Tune Up – This is the one that brings the bike back to life and is recommended for best cheer and wishes. Wheels trued, hanger aligned –race ready.
1. Select bike.
2. Select seat post clamp.
3. Clamp bike in stand.
4. Remove and read repair card.
5. Gather parts required.
6. Remove rear wheel. One tool
7. Remove skewer.
8. Remove cassette. Three tools.
9. Remove cable cap on rear derailleur. Two tools.
10. Loosen gear cable pinch bolt on rear derailleur. One tool.
11. Take off chain by undoing quick-link or pushing pin out with rivet extractor. One tool.
12. Remove rear derailleur. One tool.
13. Put chain, cassette and derailleur into the soup.
14. Remove front wheel.
15. Check front cones. Maybe two tools or none.
16. Clean rim, hub, spokes of front wheel. Install tire/tube if required. Rag and cleaner.
17. Clean and lubricate front and rear brake calipers and brake levers. Clean and lubricate front derailleur. Rags, brush, cleaner, lube, air.
18. Lick frame clean. Wax frame.
19. Install cables, ferrules and housing, brake shoes as required. *(If housing is required and the housing is beneath the handle bar wrapping it means unwrapping and rewrapping half the bar tape.) If cable and housing is internal, double the time especially on aero-bars. More time for time trial. Two tools.
20. Clean and lube headset as required without removing fork.
21. Install front wheel.
22. Take parts out of the soup. Wire brush clean cassette and chain. Blow parts off into vent. Clean derailleur pulley wheels etc., blow off into vent. One tool.
23. Clean rear wheel rim, hub, spokes, and free-hub. Install tire/tube as required. Rag, cleaner, tire lever.
24. Clean cassette cogs with rag while installing on free-hub. Rag.
25. Tighten cassette. Two tools.
26. Install rear skewer.
27. Install rear wheel.
28. Straighten derailleur hanger. One tool. 4-8 mins
29. Install derailleur. One tool.
30. Clean up chain wheel without disasembly. Rag, cleaner.
31. Install chain. Install correct connector pin. One or two tools.
32. Lube chain.
33. Torque wrench crank arm bolts. One tool.
34. Install rear derailleur cable, tighten pinch bolt. One tool.
35. Adjust gears. One tool.
36. Adjust brakes, align brake shoes. One tool.
37. Cap cable ends. One tool.
38. True wheels on bike or stand if required if replacing spokes. One tool. 3-7 mins.
39. Tighten pedals. One tool.
40. Remaining full bolt check. (Reflectors, zip ties on computers, kick stand bolts, racks, lights)
41. Remove valve caps. Inflate tires to air pressure rating on sidewall of tire.
42. Full bolt check.
43. Add air pressure. Replace valve caps. Two tools, including both air hose hand pump for 100 psi.
44. Wash hands.
45. Take off old tape from bars. Wrap and install new tape. Install bar end plugs. Two tools.
46. Check brake lever perch. One tool.
47. Check headset. One tool.
48. Torque wrench headset and bars and brake levers. One tool.
49. Install accessories. Two tools.
50. Record parts used on repair card.
51. Input information into computer.
52. Call customer.
53. Place repair card and used parts, instruction manuals etc. back on bike.
54. Attach lube container to bike.
55. Wipe bike down.
56. Hang bike up.

$60 Tune Up – Tighten to torque, Lubricate, Adjust.
1. Find bike.
2. Read repair card.
3. Clamp bike.
4. Inflate tires.
5. Centre wheels to brakes and frame.
6. Lubricate chain.
7. Lubricate derailleurs in place on bike.
8. Full bolt check.
9. Tighten pedals.
10. Tighten wheels.
11. Tighten bars.
12. Tighten components.
13. Adjust gears and brakes.
14. Derailleur hanger alignment is mechanic’s option for $25.00, at this point.
15. Wipe down frame and rims – both wheels.
16. Fill out repair card.
17. Input information into computer.
18. Phone customer.
19. Attach card.
20. Wipe frame down.
21. Hang up bike.

$200 Tune Up
Same as $150 tune up but includes either headset or bottom bracket removal and inspection. Two to six tools additional.

$400 Major Overhaul – The Full Monty (Very time consuming.) (September to March)
Everything plus an overhaul of both hubs, bottom bracket headset, pedals, pulley wheels, chain ring bolts. It’s all there is. Be prepared for parts replacement. Sixteen tools additional.

$100 Tune Up
1. Select bike.
2. Select seat post clamp.
3. Clamp bike in stand.
4. Remove and read repair card.
5. Gather parts required.
6. Remove rear wheel. One tool
7. Loosen gear cable pinch bolt on rear derailleur. One tool.
8. Remove rear derailleur. One tool.
9. Remove front wheel.
10. Check front cones. Maybe two tools or none.
11. Clean rim, hub, spokes of front wheel. Install tire/tube if required. Rag and cleaner.
12. Clean and lubricate front and rear brake calipers and brake levers. Clean and lubricate front derailleur. Rags, brush, cleaner, lube, air.
13. Install cables, ferrules and housing, brake shoes as required. *(If housing is required and the housing is beneath the handle bar wrapping it means unwrapping and rewrapping half the bar tape.) If cable and housing is internal, double the time especially on aero-bars. More time for time trial. Two tools.
14. Install front wheel.
15. Clean rear wheel rim, hub, spokes, and free-hub. Install tire/tube as required. Rag, cleaner, tire lever..
16. Install rear wheel.
17. Straighten derailleur hanger. One tool. 4-8 mins
18. Install derailleur. One tool.
19. Lube chain.
20. Torque wrench crank arm bolts. One tool.
21. Install rear derailleur cable, tighten pinch bolt. One tool.
22. Adjust gears. One tool.
23. Adjust brakes, align brake shoes. One tool.
24. Cap cable ends. One tool.
25. True wheels on bike or stand if required if replacing spokes. One tool. 3-7 mins.
26. Tighten pedals. One tool.
27. Remaining full bolt check. (Reflectors, zip ties on computers, kick stand bolts, racks, lights)
28. Remove valve caps. Find air pressure rating on sidewall of tire.
29. Add air pressure. Replace valve caps. Two tools, including both air hose hand pump for 100 psi.
30. Wash hands.
31. Take off old tape from bars. Wrap and install new tape. Install bar end plugs. Two tools.
32. Check brake lever perch. One tool.
33. Check headset. One tool.
34. Torque wrench headset and bars and brake levers. One tool.
35. Install accessories. Two tools.
36. Record parts used on repair card.
37. Input information into computer.
38. Call customer.
39. Place repair card and used parts, instruction manuals etc. back on bike.
40. Attach lube container to bike.
41. Wipe bike down.
42. Hang bike up.

$80 Drive Train Cleaning
1. Remove rear wheel.
2. Remove chain.
3. Remove cassette
4. Remove derailleur.
5. Remove crank set.
6. Check bottom bracket bearings includes labour for replacement.
7. Everything in the earth friendly biological degreaser – wire brushed clean.
8. High air pressure hosed clean.
9. Align derailleur hanger.
10. Lubricate chain. *(Discuss lubrication choice with staff. Now is the time.)
11. Install crankset, apply Park grease, torque to factory specifications.
12. Adjust gears.
13. Inflate tires, just because.
14. Record parts used on repair card.
15. Input information into computer.
16. Call customer.

The Hegelian Edge – Essential Derailleur Hanger Alignment. $25.00
Proper gear shifting may be adjusted through cable tension and replacement of worn cables and housing but that isn’t everything. Gears must be straight to work in the first place. Your hint that you have a problem is, you aren’t getting your middle gears. The derailleur hanger is made out of a softer material than the frame. Its function is to hold the rear derailleur and chain in precise alignment with the cogs on the rear wheel. A two or five degree bend on the hanger is enough to cause a problem. If the bike falls on the drive side, if it gets knocked while loading in the car or a bike rack …the gears just don’t seem to shift properly. I have found that 8 out of 10 bike repairs regardless of style require hanger alignment. You really really need it.

Could this be Roche Maier?

The resemblance is striking

In other news we got a bunch of nifty Cervelo clothing made by Castelli.

Look at what showed up in the Post

Via Ciclante is now a full fledged Yeti dealer, and we have received our first shipment of bikes and clothes. Come by and check out the amazing versatile SB5c trail /enduro bike , and for those endurance racy off road types we have the ASRc. These bikes are quite amazing but don’t take our word for it:
http://www.pinkbike.com/news/yeti-sb5c-exclusive-review-2014.html


http://velonews.competitor.com/2014/08/bikes-and-tech/reviews/first-ride-yetis-redesigned-hyper-verstile-asr-c_341787

 

So if you want to join “The Tribe” come over to Mississauga’s only Yeti dealer, Via Ciclante.

What I did for my Summer Vacation

September is here and fall is in full swing, and it’s a great time to reminisce over what good times we had this summer with riding our bikes and other warm weather shenanigans.

The highlight of summer 2014 for me was going on a trip to Whistler B.C. in early August. If you don’t already know let me tell you how awesome the cycling is in Whistler. It doesn’t really matter what kind of bike you ride, if you bring it to Whistler you will have an amazing time. The bike park is world renowned and what most people think of when they think about cycling and Whistler. The cross country mountain biking is outstanding, and in my mind does not get the respect it deserves. In B.C. they have a term for their cross country mountain biking known as BCXC, these trails consist of plenty of gnarly bits, and some great up and amazing downs. The road riding looked amazing especially if you like big climbs with numerous ups and downs, while taking in breath taking views. And for those who like their rides a little more mellow, there is a great paved path that connects the whole town, and goes by the lakes, parks, and other points of interest.

As you can likely gather, I spent all my riding time on mountain bikes. I spent one day in the park on a rental downhill bike and only used the trail to gather more speed to get back in the air, it was like Disneyland for bikes, with some of the biggest jumps I have ever hit on a bike. Stuck mostly to the flow trails which are wider machine built trails that look like a BMX track that is been laid down the side of the mountain. Occasionally hitting some tech trails which are closer to the east coast gnarly bits I’m much more accustomed to, but I figured when in Whistler we ride BIG FLOW in the park. After the better part of day spent riding down the mountain, the beers at the base tasted mighty fine!

The other 3 days I had to ride I rode BCXC, on my own trail bike hitting the trails all over the valley, and I was blown away. Never have I hit so many great trails in a row, there were minimal duds, and the duds were allowing you time to collect yourself before the next sustained bit of trail perfection. There were flowy trails with sculpted berms, tech trails with rocks and roots, stunt trails with loads of interesting woodwork, and my favourite trails that had all of that and more! I left whistler barely scratching the surface of the amount of trails to hit, I tried to sample the “greatest hits” such as “Cut yer Bars” and the “Zappa Trails” and my favourite “Danimal” after multiple hours on the trail I was left wanting to dig deeper into the massive back catalouge of trails.

On top of the amazing riding, when we were in Whistler the annual Crankworx festival was kicking off. This is a festival that celebrates mountain biking with numerous contests, demos, and events. This event concludes with the Joyride Slope style contest, which has been compared to the Super Bowl of mountain biking on numerous occasions. The trails and village wash filled with cool new products, on site pit crews to fix your bike, and sponsored pros. In a nut shell it was a giant mountain bike party and was absolutely fantastic, if you like mountain bikes that is.

-Tony

Assos maternity wear

Assos maternity wear

Finally, the temperatures are rising! We have even been teased with the occasional 20C afternoon. But if you’re like me and have a couple of jobs, a couple of kids and a million other distractions, you ride when the time presents itself. Presently, that can mean early mornings when we still see chilly 10-15 C temps.

Earlier this week I snuck in a 40 km, pre-work spin. The wind was 20 kph and the temp was 13C for the duration of the ride. In previous years I would have either froze or overheated in the cobbled together selection of mediocre gear I had bought on sale from a handful of shops. My specific issue is that I run a bit hot and have a tendency to sweat heavily on the bike. So bad in fact, I’ve had people on sunny days think its spitting rain while riding in my draft. This year I decided to lengthen my riding season by investing in some quality cycling gear. In my mind that could only mean Assos. I have been an evangelist for their long lasting bib shorts from the first time I tried them. However, at 6’1” and 225lbs I had placed their tops in the category of “aspirational,” with respect to fit. Apparently I was wrong about who these pieces are made for. These garments are so well engineered and the materials so body conforming that a single baselayer could fit a woman through all 9 months of pregnancy.

So what did I wear that morning? Bottom to top: Pearl Izumi Elite Socks, Sidi Genius 5 shoes, Assos F1.Mille S5 bib shorts, Assos Skinfoil Early-winter (5/7) baselayer, Assos iG.falkenZahn insulator gilet, Giro gloves, Kask Mojito helmet and my new obsession, DZ Nuts low-heat embrocation. This combination for me was absolutely perfect.

Why was this kit perfect for me on this day? First, a complete lack of moisture next to skin due to the wicking of the snug but comfortable baselayer/gilet combo. Second, the lack of a windproof barrier that would at this temperature trap in sweat and condensation soaking the baselayer with clammy moisture. When was the last time you came home from a hard ride and were totally dry? Third, the gilet provided just the right amount of core insulation. Four, the embrocation gave my legs a nice cosy buzz when I started working hard and offered a really nice dose of post ride heat when stretching.

So what do you wear in the chilly spring mornings? We are always looking for new interesting combos. Windproof jackets and arm/leg warmers for colder temps? Are leggings your thing? Or are you a tough SOB like the guy I saw in riding in March in jogging shorts and a t-shirt?

Gord

Layering up for spring riding


Well according to the calendar spring is March 20, but round here it’s looking anything but! I know personally that I’m itching to get out and ride, and I hear a lot of other folks are too! A lot of us and I’m sure you as well, have been doing penance on the trainer, and it is a great way to keep fit, but rings hollow in comparison riding outside on the roads and trails. That all being said you can get out on some of these “spring” days but staying comfortable is the key. Dressing for colder temps is a conundrum that eludes many cyclists but is not that tricky if you put your mind to it, having bike commuted in Thunder Bay, which makes Southern Ontario winters look downright balmy the motto is “you need to layer to be a player”!
The main gist to layering is not the one big item of clothing to keep you comfortable, but you guessed it many “layers”.
The first layer is known as a base layer or wicking layer, which is there to transport moisture (a.k.a. sweat) away from you. These can be made of synthetic materials or natural fibers such as wool or silk (just never cotton as that absorbs moisture rather than moving it on). Synthetic seems to be the best at moving moisture as the fibre cannot absorb moisture, it can only linger in the weave of the fabric. Wool and silk work in a different way that regulate your bodys’ temperature but hold onto moisture so you always feel dampish.
The second layer is your insulation layer which creates a layer to pull moisture from your base layer or wicking layer, as well as creating dead air space to insulate you from the cold. This layer can be again synthetic or wool, in extreme cases you may double up to increase your insulation depending on weather and your physiology in relation to whether you run hot or cold
Your outermost layer is your shell layer which is to keep the elements at bay such as wind and rain. Ideally this layer should be windproof and waterproof or water resistant, but of utmost importance this layer should have the ability to release excess heat. A rubber rain coat does a great job of keeping out rain and wind, but if you are working hard, it turns into a sauna, in this regard I’m a fan of jackets that give up some waterproofness in exchange for breathability.
So that is the basics of your main clothing set up, but I can hear you saying what about my hands, feet and head? Well this is the part which is not as simple, for feet, there are a couple of options in regard to warmth, the basics is warmer socks and a shoe cover, this is the most economical method, using what you have and works well for road riding, for mountain biking shoe covers are problematic due to getting off and walking and extra elements such as mud, slush, and snow. Another option is winter specific shoes which still have the ability to clip in, or larger shoes to run with flats and extra socks.
For Hands warm gloves that still allow you control your bike are important as nothing shuts you down faster than numb hands. There are many ways to play this such as layering lighter gloves, or insulated ski type gloves. My personal trick is to bring spare gloves in case you soak your gloves or need to adjust.
Lastly for your head a hat or balaclava you can wear under your helmet, cycling specific hats tend to work better than your bog standard touque which can bunch up under your helmet. Another clever trick, is to put clear packing tape over the vents on your helmet to help keep in the heat, although some of the new aero helmets with minimal venting can work well in cooler temps as well.

Now there are a lot of items to consider to keep comfortable while riding in cold yucky conditions, the best trick check your closet and build a system that adapts as the weather changes, there are many ways, to add to your existing cycling kit to adapt to many weather conditions and extend your riding season, and get the jump on old man winter!

-Tony

Mountain Bike Wheel size and what it all means.

You may have heard a lot of hub bub about wheel size on mountain bikes at you trail head, on magazines, or the interwebs. Well I’m about to add more fuel to that fire, wheel size is not the be all and end all of making a great bike (because we want to ride great bikes not good bikes!) but it does affect how the bike behaves in regard to speed, bump absorption, acceleration, steering, braking and general feel of the bike. But then again so does tire choice, suspension set up, frame geometry, cockpit set up and bucket load of other things


Which Wheel size to choose?

The long and short of it is you can make great bikes with any wheel size, and the flip side of that coin is you can make and absolute disaster of a bike out of any wheel size. You may have heard a bunch or riders telling you about the good news of 29rs being able to roll over anything like a Godzilla stomping through Osaka. You may have heard a freeriding nut whose eyes don’t quite focus and use “BRO” and “DUDE” way too much, proclaiming 26 can jump pop and boogie unlike anything else, and you might as well take up lawn bowling if you ride a 29er. Then you have all sorts of tech nerds saying this new 27.5, 650b tweener, whatever you want to call it wheel size is the best thing since talkies at the moving picture house.
Here’s how it breaks down at the moment:
26 inch wheels: aka “the old classic” a great choice for longer travel big bikes for smashing runs down hills, or for a jumping bike to throw down some tricks at your favourite jump spot. The present choice of hooligans on bikes
29 inch wheels: aka “speedy go fast” the choice of xc racers holds speed remarkably well, awesome with hard tails and short travel race whips. The present choice of number plates who enjoy ripping off each other legs in the quest to get up the hill first. (also a great choice for NBA sized folks)
27.5 inch wheels: aka “new kid on the block” The goldilocks of medium travel bike for a little bit country, a little bit rock and roll, poised to be the choice of those who want to ride it all.
What do I say? Try before you buy! I firmly believe there is a place for all the current wheel sizes and whenever there is a benefit from a change there is usually a detriment that goes with it, and you can’t polish a turd by changing the wheel size, oh, and ride your bike and don’t stress the nerdy bits, that’s our job.
-Tony

Taking the Show on the Road

Have you ever thought of taking your bike on holiday with you? Of course you have! The problem often being packaging up your pride and joy so it arrives there and back in one piece no worse for wear. So while we are in the grips of old man winter, get to  a warm sunny destination for some fun on your bike, rather than pounding it out on the trainer thinking of summer rides. We can help with the awesome Trico travel cases!( available to rent for $75 per week), we also can package your bike up if you need.  Just give us a ring or shoot down to see us in Streetsville, and we can help you get riding even when old man winter has other plans.

Royce (Via Ciclante web honcho)  sticking it to Old man winter!

-Tony